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How to build a really bloody good compensation framework – Company culture event

About the event

“If there is an industry wide-open for disruption it is that of compensation. Reward and remuneration hasn’t evolved much beyond the world of excel, salary surveys, and legacy finance systems.

Over the years I’ve been to plenty of meetups and events about this topic and I’m never left feeling particularly inspired or motivated. That sucks because comp is the heart of the commercial contracts you make with your team. How you reward them financially, and the decisions you make which form your comp strategy, strike to the very heart of the work we do in People Ops.”

Join us on Tuesday 23 March at 2:30pm New York, 7:30pm UK time, as we explore how to build a really bloody good compensation framework. There’ll be a short talk by Jessica, followed by Q&A and group discussion.

About Jessica

“I am a person and I like to think I am good enough to do it professionally. So that’s what I do. I’m a hands-on leader in People, Culture and Talent. I find my joy in diverse, kind, and world-changing companies filled with excellent people, which is why I am at Whereby, where our mission is to give people freedom to live and work where they thrive. (How fantastic is that?)”

About Culturevist

Culturevist is a community of people who care about company culture and wellbeing. Join us to:

1. Learn from Jessica Hayes, VP People at Whereby.
2. Have a chance to ask your questions.
3. Become part of a special community.

How to join

This event is part of the Culturevist membership event series.

Not yet a member?

If this is the first Members event you’ll be joining, you can attend it for free.

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People Experience meetup

An invitation-only online meetup for people who work in People Experience teams (or Employee / Colleague Experience teams)

Meet peers in the same role

Discover people with a common interest in the same role

Keep up with the industry

We’ll share our approaches (those that would like to), to help us get external perspectives.

Development

An opportunity for us to learn from each other.

What people say about our events

Our next People Experience meetup

Thursday 4 March
11:30am PT, 2:30pm ET

Theme: How do you measure People Experience?

Want to hear about future events? Sign up to our newsletter below.

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Head of Culture meetup

An invitation-only online meetup for people who are a Head of Culture (or Director, VP, Lead, etc.)

Meet other Heads of Culture

Discover people with a common interest and accountability

Keep up with the industry

We’ll share our approaches (those of us that would like to), to help us get external perspectives.

Development

An opportunity for us to learn from each other.

What people say about our events

Our next Head of Culture meetup

Wednesday 17 March
12:30pm PT, 3:30pm ET

Theme: Measuring culture

Want to hear about future events? Sign up to our newsletter below.

Posted on

Head of Culture meetup

An invitation-only online meetup for people who are a Head of Culture (or Director, VP, Lead, etc.)

Meet other Heads of Culture

Discover people with a common interest and accountability

Keep up with the industry

We’ll share our approaches (those of us that would like to), to help us get external perspectives.

Development

An opportunity for us to learn from each other.

What people say about our events

Our next Head of Culture meetups

Thursday 18 February – 7:30pm

Theme: What’s the scope of our roles? What are our objectives?

Wednesday 17 March – 7:30pm

Theme: Measuring culture

Want to hear about future events? Sign up to our newsletter below.

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People Experience meetup

An invitation-only online meetup for people who work in People Experience teams (or Employee / Colleague Experience teams)

Meet peers in the same role

Discover people with a common interest in the same role

Keep up with the industry

We’ll share our approaches (those that would like to), to help us get external perspectives.

Development

An opportunity for us to learn from each other.

What people say about our events

Our next People Experience meetup

Wednesday 24 February – 7:30pm

Theme: How do you measure People Experience?

Want to hear about future events? Sign up to our newsletter below.

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Highlights from Netflix’s first inclusion report

In a beautiful example of transparency, vulnerability and strength, this month Netflix shared their first inclusion report. Vernā Myers, VP of Inclusion Strategy, describes it as “providing a snapshot of representation within the company, how we plan to increase it, and how we cultivate a community of belonging and allyship.”

The full article is here, and we highly recommend this video to get an insight into Vernā’s, and the team’s, mindsets and work:

We thought we’d shine a light on some of our highlights:

Inclusion is seen as a lens to be engrained in everything that happens, rather than being a bolt-on afterthought or just empty words.

Each employee needs to look at every issue, decision, and meeting, inside and outside the company with inclusion in mind. We call this an ‘inclusion lens’, where employees ask questions like, whose voice is missing? Who is being excluded? Are we portraying this authentically?”

There’s the view that to be inclusive externally, it starts with being inclusive internally. As Co-CEO and Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos puts it:

Inclusion on-screen starts with inclusion in our internal community.

Netflix representation numbers as of October 2020:

Addressing the systemic changes

“We’ve made good progress over the last three years. You can dig into the trends in the footnotes. But let’s be clear, we’re not where we want to be and we need to do better.”

“The inclusion recruiting programs team built a training curriculum to do this more inclusively, with topics like: spotting bias in the interview process, sourcing candidates in non-traditional ways, and helping hiring managers identify the perspectives missing on their teams.”

“Systemic issues have excluded certain groups from the entertainment and tech industry. We can dismantle those systems by creating access to people early on in their careers. For instance, there’s low representation of Black folks in the tech industry. Our first technical bootcamp with HBCU Norfolk University hopes to improve that.”

They have partnered with external organisations to further build diverse networks, and build internal communities.

Company policies and practices reflect different religions, family responsibilities, gender identities, disabilities.

“Equitable Pay: We practice “open compensation,” which means the top 1,000 leaders (directors and above) at the company can see how much any employee is paid. This encourages open discussions about pay disparities.”

“Inclusive Benefits: We want our benefits to work for everyone. Our flexible parental leave policy is gender-blind. We offer a family forming benefit to support employees on their fertility, surrogacy, or adoption journey. It’s available to employees regardless of marital status, gender, or sexual orientation. And we cover comprehensive transgender and non-binary care in our U.S. health plans. Outside of the U.S., we’re exploring how we can expand transgender coverage.”

A beautiful example of transparency, vulnerability and strength. This month @Netflix shared their first inclusion report. Here our some of our highlights from the piece by @Vernamyers, VP of Inclusion Strategy

You can read the article on Netflix.com here.

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Getting More Useful Feedback – Company Culture Event

Culturevist is a community of people who care about company culture and wellbeing. Join us to:

1. Learn from Maria Campbell’s experience in getting more useful feedback.
2. Have a chance to ask your questions.
3. Become part of a special community.

About the event

If your boss puts an hour in your calendar titled “Feedback”, you might well not be able to focus on anything until you hear the news.

Many of us have an inbuilt fear of being given feedback. It can feel big, formal, serious, scary – and like it’s usually bad. It’s a dark and unpleasant surprise to be dreaded.

But feedback is necessary, useful, and we should see it as a valuable force for our own personal success. If we want to be successful, better at doing what we do, respected and valued by the people around us, then we need to care about the feedback we get.

We need to reset on what feedback actually is, to unwind its negative connotations, and we need to adopt a better internal model of how to classify the feedback we get. Then we can lean into feedback, seek it out, and make use of it – rather than shying away from the things that could help us most.

On Wednesday 10 February, we’ll explore how to do this, and more. There’ll be a short talk by Maria, followed by Q&A and group discussion.

About Maria

Maria’s built a career leading People, HR & Recruitment in high-growth tech startups, taking them from early stage through growth, from 30-300 employees. She’s worked at Monzo, Snyk, GoCardless and Permutive.

What people say about our events

How to join

This event is part of the Culturevist membership event series.

Not yet a member?

If this is the first Members event you’ll be joining, you can attend it for free.

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Learnings from operating a 4 day work week: Buffer

Buffer is a company that have been operating a 4 day work week (rather than 5 days that was the norm). Joel Gascoigne, their co-founder and CEO, and Caryn Black Hubbard, Vice President of Finance, have shared their learnings about it. Here’s a curation of some highlights of the conversation to help us all learn.

Would you like your team to have 4 day working weeks? Here are some of @JoelGascoigne’s and @westcoasthubbs’s practical and inspiring learnings from 9 months of doing it @Buffer